open - Wiktionary

open – Wiktionary

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Center English open, from Previous English open (open), from Proto-Germanic *upanaz (open), from Proto-Indo-European *upo (up from underneath, over). Cognate with Scots apen (open), Saterland Frisian eepen (open), West Frisian iepen (open), Dutch open (open), Low German open, apen (open), German offen (open), Danish åben (open), Swedish öppen (open), Norwegian Bokmål åpen (open), Norwegian Nynorsk open (open), Icelandic opinn (open). Evaluate additionally Latin supinus (on one’s again, supine), Albanian hap (to open). Associated to up.

Adjective[edit]

An indication indicating {that a} store is open

open (comparative extra open, superlative most open)

  1. (not comparable) Not closed
    1. capable of be accessed
    2. capable of have one thing cross by means of or alongside it.

      Flip left after the second open door.

    3. (of a physique half) not coated, displaying what’s inside

      It was as if his physique had gone to sleep standing up and along with his eyes open.

  2. Not bodily drawn collectively, closed, folded or contracted; prolonged

    an open hand; an open flower

  3. (not comparable) Actively conducting or ready to conduct enterprise.

    Banks are usually not open on financial institution holidays.

    • 2013 July 20, “The assault of the MOOCs”, in The Economist, quantity 408, quantity 8845:

      For the reason that launch early final yr of […] two Silicon Valley start-ups providing free schooling by means of MOOCs, large open on-line programs, the ivory towers of academia have been shaken to their foundations. College manufacturers inbuilt some instances over centuries have been compelled to ponder the likelihood that data know-how will quickly make their present enterprise mannequin out of date.

  4. (comparable) Receptive.

    I’m open to new concepts.

    • c. 1596–1599, William Shakespeare, “The Second A part of Henry the Fourth, []”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Revealed In line with the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, printed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act V, scene ii]:

      The service that I actually did his life, / Hath left me open to all accidents.

  5. (not comparable) Public

    He printed an open letter to the governor on a full web page of the New York Occasions.

    • c. 1597, William Shakespeare, “The Merry VViues of VVindsor”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Revealed In line with the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, printed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act I, scene iii]:

      His thefts have been too open.

    • 1667, John Milton, “Ebook III”, in Paradise Misplaced. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Misplaced in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:

      That I’ll discover him, and with secret gaze / Or open admiration him behold.

  6. (not comparable) Candid, ingenuous, not delicate in character.

    The person is an open e book.

    • 1731-1735, Alexander Pope, Ethical Essays
      with side open, shall erect his head
    • c. 1603–1604, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Othello, the Moore of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Revealed In line with the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, printed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act I, scene iii]:

      The Moor is of a free and open nature.

    • 1705 (revised 1718), Joseph Addison, Remarks on A number of Components of Italy
      The French are all the time open, acquainted, and talkative.
  7. (arithmetic, logic, of a formulation) Having a free variable.
  8. (arithmetic, topology, of a set) Which is a part of a predefined assortment of subsets of
  9. (graph idea, of a stroll) Whose first and final vertices are completely different.
  10. (computing, not comparable, of a file, doc, and so on.) In present use; mapped to a part of reminiscence.

    I could not save my modifications as a result of one other consumer had the identical file open.

  11. (enterprise) Not fulfilled.

    I’ve acquired open orders for as many containers of purple durum as you will get me.

  12. Not settled or adjusted; not determined or decided; not closed or withdrawn from consideration.
    an open query
    to maintain a proposal or alternative open
    your account will stay open till we obtain last settlement.
  13. (music, stringed devices) Of a observe, performed with out urgent the string towards the fingerboard.
  14. (music, wind devices) Of a observe, performed with out closing any finger-hole, key or valve.
  15. Not of a high quality to forestall communication, as by closing waterways, blocking roads, and so on.; therefore, not frosty or inclement; gentle; used of the climate or the local weather.
    an open winter
  16. (regulation) (Of correspondence) Written or despatched with the intention that it might made public or referred to at any trial, reasonably than by means of confidential personal negotiation for a settlement. (Reverse of “with out prejudice”)
    You’ll observe that that is an open letter and we reserve the precise to say it to the decide ought to the matter come to trial.
  17. (phonetics) Uttered with a comparatively huge opening of the articulating organs; mentioned of vowels.
    • 1959, Anthony Burgess, Beds within the East (The Malayan Trilogy), printed 1972, web page 421:

      “Supposing anyone sees you, with all these flowers too? Supposing anyone writes him a letter? Ooooh!” (a pure spherical open Tamil O.)

  18. (phonetics) Uttered, as a consonant, with the oral passage merely narrowed with out closure.
  19. (phonetics, of a syllable) That ends in a vowel; not having a coda.
  20. (computing, schooling) Made public, usable with a free licence and with out proprietary parts.
  21. (drugs) Ensuing from an incision, puncture or some other course of by which the pores and skin not protects an inside a part of the physique.
  22. (computing) (used earlier than “code”) supply code of a pc program that isn’t inside the textual content of a macro being generated.
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Hyponyms[edit]
Derived phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations under have to be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry structure § Translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Center English openen, from Previous English openian (to open), from Proto-Germanic *upanōną (to lift; carry; open), from Proto-Germanic *upanaz (open, adjective). Cognate with Saterland Frisian eepenje (to open), West Frisian iepenje (to open), Dutch openen (to open), German öffnen (to open), Danish åbne (to open), Swedish öppna (to open), Norwegian Bokmål åpne (to open), Norwegian Nynorsk and Icelandic opna (to open). Associated to English up.

Verb[edit]

open (third-person singular easy current opens, current participle opening, easy previous and previous participle opened)

  1. (transitive) To make one thing accessible or permit for passage by shifting from a shut place.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 7, in Mr. Pratt’s Sufferers:

      I made a talking trumpet of my arms and commenced to whoop “Ahoy!” and “Howdy!” on the prime of my lungs. […] The Colonel wakened, and, after asking what in brimstone was the matter, opened his mouth and roared “Hello!” and “Howdy!” just like the bull of Bashan.

    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 20, in The China Governess[1]:

      ‘No. I solely opened the door a foot and put my head in. The road lamps shine into that room. I might see him. He was all proper. Sleeping like a terrific grampus. Poor, poor chap.’

    Flip the doorknob to open the door.

  2. (transitive) To make (an open area, and so on.) by clearing away an impediment or obstacles, so as to permit for passage, entry, or visibility.

    He opened a path by means of the undergrowth.

  3. (transitive) To carry up, broach.

    I do not need to open that topic.

  4. (transitive) To enter upon, start.

    to open a dialogue

    to open fireplace upon an enemy

    to open commerce, or correspondence

    to open a case in court docket, or a gathering

  5. (transitive) To unfold; to broaden into an open or unfastened place.

    to open a closed fist

    to open matted cotton by separating the fibres

    to open a map, e book, or scroll

  6. (transitive) To make accessible to prospects or purchasers.

    I’ll open the store an hour early tomorrow.

  7. (transitive) To begin (a marketing campaign).

    Vermont will open elk looking season subsequent week.

  8. (intransitive) To grow to be open.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt’s Sufferers:

      I stumbled alongside by means of the younger pines and huckleberry bushes. Fairly quickly I struck right into a type of path that, I cal’lated, may result in the highway I used to be trying to find. It twisted and turned, and, the very first thing I knew, made a sudden bend round a bunch of bayberry scrub and opened out into an enormous clear area like a garden.

    The door opened all by itself.

  9. (intransitive) To start conducting enterprise.

    The store opens at 9:00.

  10. (intransitive, cricket) To start a aspect’s innings as one of many first two batsmen.
  11. (intransitive, poker) To wager earlier than some other participant has in a specific betting spherical in a sport of poker.

    After the primary two gamers fold, Julie opens for $5.

  12. (transitive, intransitive, poker) To disclose one’s hand.

    Jeff opens his hand revealing a straight flush.

  13. (computing, transitive, intransitive, of a file, doc, and so on.) To load into reminiscence for viewing or modifying.
  14. (out of date) To reveal; to disclose; to interpret; to elucidate.
Synonyms[edit]
Hyponyms[edit]
  • (to make accessible): crack (open a bit)
Antonyms[edit]
Derived phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations under have to be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry structure § Translations.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Center English open (an aperture or opening), from the verb (see Etymology 2 above). Within the sports activities sense, nevertheless, a shortening of “open competitors”.

Noun[edit]

open (plural opens)

  1. (with the) Open or unobstructed area; an uncovered location.
    I can not imagine you left the lawnmower out in the open once you knew it was going to rain this afternoon!
    Cautious of hunters, the fleeing deer saved properly out of the open, dodging as an alternative from thicket to thicket.
  2. (with the) Public information or scrutiny; full view.
    We’ve got acquired to carry this firm’s corrupt enterprise practices into the open.
  3. (electronics) A defect in {an electrical} circuit stopping present from flowing.
    The electrician discovered the open within the circuit after a couple of minutes of testing.
  4. A sports activities occasion wherein anyone can compete

Derived phrases[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch openen, from Center Dutch ōpenen, from Previous Dutch opanon, from Proto-Germanic *upanōną.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

open (current open, current participle openende, previous participle geopen)

  1. (transitive) to open

Associated phrases[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English open.

Noun[edit]

open m (plural open or òpens)

  1. (sports activities) open

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Center Dutch ōpen, from Previous Dutch opan, from Proto-Germanic *upanaz.

Adjective[edit]

open (comparative opener, superlative openst)

  1. open, not closed
    Antonyms: gesloten, dicht, toe
  2. open for enterprise
    Antonyms: gesloten, dicht
  3. open, receptive
    Antonym: gesloten
Inflection[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived phrases[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the primary entry.

Verb[edit]

open

  1. first-person singular current indicative of openen
  2. crucial of openen

Anagrams[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

open

  1. genitive singular of ope

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English open.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

open m (plural opens)

  1. open; open match

Additional studying[edit]


Center Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Previous Dutch opan, from Proto-Germanic *upanaz.

Adjective[edit]

ōpen

  1. open, not closed
  2. open, accessible
  3. freely accessible, public

Inflection[edit]

This adjective wants an inflection-table template.

Derived phrases[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Additional studying[edit]


Center English[edit]

Various types[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Previous English open, from Proto-Germanic *upanaz.

Adjective[edit]

open (comparative extra open, superlative most open)

  1. open
    • 14th c. Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales. Common Prologue: 9-11.
      And smale foweles maken melodye,
      That slepen al the nyght with open eye-
      (So priketh hem Nature in hir corages);

      And plenty of little birds make melody
      That sleep by means of all of the evening with open eye
      (So Nature pricks them on to ramp and rage)

Associated phrases[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Previous Norse opinn, from Proto-Germanic *upanaz. Evaluate Danish åben, Icelandic opinn, Swedish öppen, Dutch open, Low German apen, open, German offen, West Frisian iepen, English open.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

open (masculine and female open, neuter ope or opent, particular singular and plural opne, comparative opnare, indefinite superlative opnast, particular superlative opnaste)

  1. open
    Kvifor er døra open?

    Why is the door open?

Associated phrases[edit]

See additionally[edit]

References[edit]


Previous English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *upanaz. Initially a previous participle of Proto-Germanic *ūpaną (to carry up, open). Akin to Previous English ūp (up). Cognate with Previous Frisian open, opin, epen (West Frisian iepen), Previous Saxon opan, open (Low German apen, open), Dutch open, Previous Excessive German offan, ofan, ophan (German offen), Previous Norse opinn (Danish åben, Norwegian open, Swedish öppen).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

open

  1. open

Declension[edit]

Derived phrases[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Plautdietsch[edit]

Adjective[edit]

open

  1. open

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English open.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈopen/, [ˈopẽn]

Noun[edit]

open m (plural opens or open)

  1. (sports activities) open

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