pool - Wiktionary

pool – Wiktionary

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Center English pool, pole, pol, from Previous English pōl (pool), from Proto-Germanic *pōlaz (pool, pond), from Proto-Indo-European *bale- (lavatory, marsh). Cognate with Scots puil (pool), Saterland Frisian Pol (pool), West Frisian poel (pool), Dutch poel (pool), Low German Pohl, Pul (pool), German Pfuhl (quagmire, mudhole), Danish pøl (puddle), Swedish pöl (puddle, pool), Icelandic pollur (puddle), Lithuanian bala (lavatory, marsh, swamp, pool), Latvian bala (a muddly, treeless despair), Russian боло́то (bolóto, swamp, lavatory, marsh).

Noun[edit]

A pool (as one provided by a spring or occurring in the middle of a stream)

pool (plural swimming pools)

  1. A small and relatively deep assortment of (normally) contemporary water, as one provided by a spring, or occurring in the middle of a stream; a reservoir for water.
    the swimming pools of Solomon
    • 1610–1611, William Shakespeare, “The Tempest”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Printed In response to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, printed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act IV, scene i], web page 15, column 2:

      [] at laſt I left them / I’th’ filthy mantled poole past your Cell, / There dancing vp to th’ chins, that the fowle Lake / Ore-ſtunck their ft.

    • 1625, Francis Bacon, “Of Marriage And Single Life. VIII.”, in The Essayes [], London: [] Iohn Haviland [], printed 1632, OCLC 863527675, web page 37:

      A Single Life doth nicely with Church-men : For Charitie will hardly water the Floor, the place it muſt firſt fill a Poole.

    • 1833, Alfred Tennyson, “The Miller’s Daughter”, in Poems, fifth version, Edward Moxon, printed 1848, web page 86:

      I cherished the brimming wave that swam / Thro’ quiet meadows around the mill, / The sleepy pool above the dam, / The pool beneath it by no means nonetheless, / The meal-sacks on the whiten’d flooring, / The darkish spherical of the dripping wheel, / The very air in regards to the door / Made misty with the floating meal.

  2. A small physique of standing or stagnant water; a puddle.
  3. Ellipsis of swimming pool
  4. A provide of assets.

    There’s a restricted pool of candidates from which to decide on the brand new supervisor.

    courting pool

    • 1962 June, Rupert Shervington, “The planning and execution of the Kent Coast electrification”, in Trendy Railways, web page 390:

      The 4-BEP and 4-CEP inventory is maintained in a typical pool for each Chatham and South Jap quick main-line companies.

    • 2020 October 15, Alana Semuels, “Employees Who Had been Laid Off Say They’re Being Handed Over—For Their Personal Jobs”, in Time[1]:

      This isn’t essentially stunning; employers usually use recessions to pay new staff much less as a result of they’ve such a big pool of potential candidates to select from, says Ruth Milkman, the Labor Research Chair on the Metropolis College of New York’s College of Labor and City Research.

  5. (by extension, computing) A set of assets which are stored prepared to make use of.
  6. A small quantity of liquid on a floor.
    a pool of blood
  7. A localized glow of sunshine.
    • 1991, Stephen King, Needful Issues:

      He walked slowly, passing by way of one pool of sunshine after one other, his shadow operating tall throughout the fronts of the barber store, the Western Auto, the video-rental store.

Derived phrases[edit]
Descendants[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations beneath must be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry format § Translations.

Verb[edit]

pool (third-person singular easy current swimming pools, current participle pooling, easy previous and previous participle pooled)

  1. (intransitive, of a liquid) To kind a pool.

Etymology 2[edit]

From French poule (collective stakes in a sport). The OED means that this can be a transferred use of poule (hen), which has been defined anecdotally as deriving from an previous casual betting sport in France – ‘jeu de poule’ – Sport of Rooster (or Hen, actually) during which poule turned synonymous with the mixed cash pot claimed by the winner.

Noun[edit]

pool (plural swimming pools)

  1. (video games, uncountable) A sport at billiards, during which every of the gamers stakes a sure sum, the winner taking the entire; additionally, in public billiard rooms, a sport during which the loser pays the doorway price for all who interact within the sport.
  2. (sports activities) A cue sport performed on a pool desk. There are 15 balls, 7 of 1 color, 7 of one other, and the black ball (additionally known as the Eight ball). A participant should pocket all their very own color balls after which the black ball so as to win.
  3. In rifle taking pictures, a contest during which every competitor pays a sure sum for each shot he makes, the online proceeds being divided among the many winners.
  4. Any playing or industrial enterprise during which a number of individuals be a part of.
  5. The stake performed for in sure video games of playing cards, billiards, and so on.; an aggregated stake to which every participant has contributed a share; additionally, the receptacle for the stakes.
  6. A mix of individuals contributing cash for use for the aim of accelerating or miserable the market value of shares, grain, or different commodities; additionally, the combination of the sums so contributed.
    The pool took all of the wheat supplied beneath the restrict.
    He put $10,000 into the pool.
  7. A set of gamers in quadrille and so on.
  8. (rail transport) A mutual association between competing traces, by which the receipts of all are aggregated, after which distributed professional rata in response to settlement.
  9. (legislation) An aggregation of properties or rights, belonging to totally different folks in a neighborhood, in a typical fund, to be charged with widespread liabilities.
Derived phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

pool (third-person singular easy current swimming pools, current participle pooling, easy previous and previous participle pooled)

  1. (transitive) To place collectively; contribute to a typical fund, on the premise of a mutual division of earnings or losses; to make a typical curiosity of.

    We should pool our assets.

    • 1920, Frank L. Packard, The White Moll Chapter 4
      “She should be exceedingly intelligent to have crushed the police the best way she has for the previous couple of years; and—er—I worship on the shrine of cleverness—particularly if or not it’s a girl’s. The concept struck me final evening that if she and I ought to—er—pool our assets, we must always not must complain of the reward.”
      “Oh, so youse desires to work wid her, eh?” sniffed Rhoda Grey. “So dat’s it, is it?”
    • 2007 November, Elizabeth Drake, “Mix and conquer: Use these profitable meals pairings to guard your well being”, in Males’s Well being, quantity 22, quantity 9, ISSN 1054-4836, web page 124:

      It began 6 years in the past, as Rutgers College scientists Allan Conney, Ph.D., and George C. Wagner, Ph.D., chatted at an workplace get-together. [] From this dialog, the 2 determined to pool their information and be a part of forces.

    • 27 February 2010, Barack Obama, Presidential Weekly Handle – Time for Us to Act
      Many on each side agreed that we must always give small companies and people the power to take part in a brand new insurance coverage market – which members of Congress would additionally use – that might enable them to pool their buying energy and get a greater deal from insurance coverage corporations.
  2. (intransitive) To mix or contribute with others, as for a industrial, speculative, or playing transaction.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin polus, which itself is from Historic Greek πόλος (pólos, axis). Cognate with English pole.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pool c (plural polen, diminutive pooltje n)

  1. magnetic pole (particularly of the Earth and different celestial our bodies)
  2. electrical pole (e.g. of a battery)
  3. (figuratively) an opposing facet of a precept or a doctrine
Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From English pool.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pool m (plural swimming pools, diminutive pooltje n)

  1. a playing enterprise comparable to a soccer pool
  2. the stake concerned in such a enterprise
  3. an association the place folks pool in cash to share one useful resource comparable to a carpool
  4. (sports activities) pool
Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Center Dutch pool, from Previous French poil, from Latin pilus (hair). Cognate with English pile

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pool c (plural polen, diminutive pooltje n)

  1. the pile (upstanding normally tremendous hair) on sure materials, velvet or carpeting

Anagrams[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *pooli, from Proto-Uralic *pälä. Cognates embrace Finnish puoli (half, facet), Mansi па̄л (pāl, half, facet), Hungarian fél (half).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pool (genitive poole, partitive poolt)

  1. half
  2. facet
    koledam pool

    the ugly facet
Inflection[edit]

The nonstandard plural partitive poolesid is considerably widespread in colloquial use.

Postposition[edit]

pool

  1. at, to, in the direction of
    põhja pool

    to the north, in the north
Inflection[edit]
allative: poole
adessive: pool
ablative: poolt

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pool (genitive pooli, partitive pooli)

  1. bobbin, coil
Inflection[edit]
See additionally[edit]

Ingrian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *pooli, from Proto-Uralic *pälä. Cognates with Finnish puoli and Estonian pool.

Noun[edit]

pool (genitive poolen, partitive poolt)

  1. half

Noun[edit]

pool

  1. massive fireplace (which causes harm)

Sambali[edit]

Noun[edit]

pool

  1. fireplace

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

pool m (plural pooles)

  1. pool (sport)

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Since 1968; from English pool, associated to Swedish pöl, small water pool, normally on the street when it is raining.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pool c

  1. a swimming pool

Declension[edit]

Associated phrases[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Yucatec Maya[edit]

Noun[edit]

pool m (plural pooles)

  1. head

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