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public – Wiktionary

English[edit]

Various types[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Anglo-Norman publik, public, Center French public, publique et al., and their supply, Latin pūblicus (pertaining to the folks). Examine folks.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈpʌblɪk/
  • Hyphenation: pub‧lic

Adjective[edit]

public (comparative extra public, superlative most public)

  1. Capable of be seen or identified by everybody; open to normal view, taking place with out concealment. [from 14th c.]
    • 2011 April 18, Sandra Laville, The Guardian:

      Earlier this month Godwin needed to make a public apology to the household of Daniel Morgan after the collapse of a £30m inquiry into his homicide in 1987.

    • 2013 June 28, Joris Luyendijk, “Our banks are uncontrolled”, in The Guardian Weekly, quantity 189, quantity 3, web page 21:

      Seeing the British institution wrestle with the monetary sector is like watching an alcoholic […].  Till 2008 there was denial over what finance had turn into. When a collection of financial institution failures made this inconceivable, there was widespread anger, resulting in the public humiliation of symbolic figures.

  2. Pertaining to the folks as an entire (versus a non-public group); regarding the entire nation, neighborhood and so on. [from 15th c.]
    • 2010, Adam Vaughan, The Guardian, 16 Sep 2010:
      A mere 3% of the greater than 1,000 folks interviewed mentioned they really knew what the convention was about. It appears secure to say public consciousness of the Conference on Organic Consciousness in Nagoya – and its aim of safeguarding wildlife – is near non-existent.
    • 2013 Might 17, George Monbiot, “Cash simply makes the wealthy undergo”, in The Guardian Weekly[1], quantity 188, quantity 23, web page 19:

      With the intention to grant the wealthy these pleasures, the social contract is reconfigured. […]  The public realm is privatised, the rules restraining the ultra-wealthy and the businesses they management are deserted, and Edwardian ranges of inequality are nearly fetishised.

  3. Formally representing the neighborhood; carried out or funded by the state on behalf of the neighborhood. [from 15th c.]
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 22, in The Mirror and the Lamp:

      From one other viewpoint, it was a spot and not using a soul. The well-to-do had hearts of stone; the wealthy have been brutally bumptious; the Press, the Municipality, all of the public males, have been ridiculously, vaingloriously self-satisfied.

    • 2004, The Guardian, Chief, 18 Jun 2004:
      However tradition’s complete price range is a tiny proportion of all public spending; it is among the authorities’s most seen success tales.
  4. Open to all members of a neighborhood; particularly, offered by nationwide or native authorities and supported by cash from taxes. [from 15th c.]
    • 2011, David Smith, The Guardian, 10 Might 2011:
      Some are left for lifeless on garbage ideas, in refuge luggage or at public bathrooms.
    • 2013 June 14, Jonathan Freedland, “Obama’s as soon as hip model is now tainted”, in The Guardian Weekly, quantity 189, no 1, web page 18:

      Now we’re liberal with our innermost secrets and techniques, spraying them into the public ether with a generosity our forebears couldn’t have imagined. The place we as soon as despatched love letters in a sealed envelope, or caught images of our youngsters in a household album, now such non-public materials is despatched to servers and clouds operated by folks we do not know and can by no means meet.

  5. (of an organization) Traded publicly through a inventory market.
  6. (not comparable, object-oriented programming) Accessible to this system typically, not solely to the category or any subclasses.

Antonyms[edit]

Derived phrases[edit]

Associated phrases[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations under must be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry structure § Translations.

Noun[edit]

public (often uncountable, plural publics)

  1. The folks typically, no matter membership of any specific group.
    Members of the public might not proceed past this level.
    • 1905, Baroness Emmuska Orczy, chapter 2, in The Tremarn Case[2]:

      “Two or three months extra glided by ; the public have been eagerly awaiting the arrival of this semi-exotic claimant to an English peerage, and sensations, surpassing these of the Tichbourne case, have been appeared ahead to with palpitating curiosity. []

    • 2007 Might 4, Martin Jacques, The Guardian
      Bush and Blair stand condemned by their very own publics and face imminent political extinction.
  2. (archaic) A public home; an inn.
    (Can we discover and add a citation of Sir Walter Scott to this entry?)

Utilization notes[edit]

  • Though usually thought of uncountable, this noun does even have countable utilization, as within the citation above.

Derived phrases[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations under must be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry structure § Translations.

References[edit]

  • public at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • public in Key phrases for At the moment: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Key phrases Undertaking, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • public in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • public in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911.

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin publicus.

Adjective[edit]

public (female singular publique, masculine plural publics, female plural publiques)

  1. public

Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun use of public (examine Latin publicum).

Noun[edit]

public m (plural publics)

  1. public (folks typically)
  2. viewers
    Il devait plaire à son public.

    He needed to please his viewers

Additional studying[edit]


Adjective[edit]

public m pl

  1. plural of publich

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin publicus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

public m (female singular publica, masculine plural publics, female plural publicas)

  1. public
    Antonym: privat

Derived phrases[edit]

Noun[edit]

public m (plural publics)

  1. public, viewers

Previous French[edit]

Various types[edit]

Adjective[edit]

public m (indirect and nominative female singular publique)

  1. public (not non-public; obtainable to the overall populace)

Derived phrases[edit]

References[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French public < Latin publicus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

public m or n (female singular publică, masculine plural publici, female and neuter plural publice)

  1. public

Noun[edit]

public n (plural publice)

  1. the public

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