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un – Wiktionary

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See ‘un and one.

Noun[edit]

un (plural uns)

  1. (dialectal) One.

Different types[edit]

Derived phrases[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ūnus. Examine Romanian un.

Article[edit]

un (female unã)

  1. (indefinite article) a, an

Associated phrases[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Different types[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ūnus.

Numeral[edit]

un or unu m (female una)

  1. one

Azerbaijani[edit]

Noun[edit]

un (particular accusative unu, plural unlar)

  1. flour

Declension[edit]


Binandere[edit]

Noun[edit]

un

  1. water

Additional studying[edit]

  • Jonathan Paul Wilson, Binandere nominal buildings (1996)

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *ʉn, from Proto-Celtic *oinos, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

Article[edit]

un

  1. a/an

See additionally[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Outdated Occitan un, from Latin ūnum (one), accusative type of ūnus (one), from Outdated Latin oinos, from Proto-Italic *oinos, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

Pronunciation[edit]

Article[edit]

un m (female una, masculine plural uns, female plural unes)

  1. an; the indefinite article
  2. (within the plural) some

Utilization notes[edit]

  • In contrast to English, Catalan makes use of the indefinite article with plural nouns in addition to singular nouns.
  • Catalan cardinal numbers could also be used as masculine or female adjectives, besides un/una (1), dos/dues (2), cents/centes (100s) and its compounds. When used as nouns, Catalan cardinal numbers are handled as masculine singular nouns in most contexts, however in expressions involving time akin to la una i trenta (1:30) or les dues (two o’clock), they’re female as a result of the female noun hora has been elided.

Numeral[edit]

un m (female una, noun type u)

  1. one

Pronoun[edit]

un m sg (female una)

  1. one; indefinite pronoun

Derived phrases[edit]


Chamorro[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

(This etymology is lacking or incomplete. Please add to it, or talk about it on the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronoun[edit]

un

  1. thou, you (singular)

    Kao un taitai i lepblo-mu?Did you learn your guide?

Utilization notes[edit]
See additionally[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Spanish un.

Article[edit]

un

  1. a, an

References[edit]

  • Donald M. Topping (1973) Chamorro Reference Grammar[1], Honolulu: College of Hawaii Press.

Chinese language[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the clipping of English understand.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

un

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese, colloquial) to grasp

Chuukese[edit]

Verb[edit]

un

  1. to drink

Cimbrian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Center Excessive German unde, from Outdated Excessive German unti, from Proto-Germanic *andi. Cognate with German und, Dutch en, English and, Icelandic enn.

Conjunction[edit]

un

  1. (Luserna, Sette Comuni) and

References[edit]

  • “un” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st version, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo
  • “un” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Corsican[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin unus (one), from Outdated Latin oinos, from Proto-Italic *oinos, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos. Cognates embrace Italian un (a) and French un (a, one).

Article[edit]

un m (female una)

  1. a, an

Dongxiang[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

un

  1. Different type of uwun (winter)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

un

  1. snake

References[edit]

  • Tyron, D.T., Hackman, B. (1983) Solomon Islands languages: An inner classification. Cited in: “Dehu” in Greenhill, S.J., Blust, R., & Grey, R.D. (2008). The Austronesian Fundamental Vocabulary Database: From Bioinformatics to Lexomics. Evolutionary Bioinformatics, 4:271-283.
  • Leenhardt, M. (1946) Langues et dialectes de l’Austro-Mèlanèsie. Cited in: “ⁿDe’u” in Greenhill, S.J., Blust, R., & Grey, R.D. (2008). The Austronesian Fundamental Vocabulary Database: From Bioinformatics to Lexomics. Evolutionary Bioinformatics, 4:271-283.

Dutch Low Saxon[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

un

  1. and

Etymology[edit]

From Outdated Portuguese un, from Latin ūnus (one), from Proto-Indo-European *óynos (one; single).

Article[edit]

un m (plural un-os, female un-a, female plural un-as)

  1. a (masculine singular indefinite article)
    • 2000, Domingo Frades Gaspar, Vamus a falal: Notas pâ coñocel y platical en nosa fala, Editora regional da Extremadura, Theme I, Chapter 2: Númerus?:

      As lenguas, idiomas, dialectus o falas tenin un-as funciós mui claras desde o principiu dos siglu i si hai contabilizaus en o mundu un-as 8.000 lenguas, ca un-a con sua importancia numérica relativa, a nossa fala é un tesoiru mais entre elas.

      The tongues, languages or regional variants have some very clear features for the reason that starting of the centuries and a few 8,000 languages have been accounted for on the earth, every with its relative numerical significance, our Fala is andifferent treasure amongst them.

Numeral[edit]

un

  1. one (numerical worth equal to 1)

Associated phrases[edit]


Etymology[edit]

From Outdated French un, from Latin ūnum, accusative singular of ūnus (one), from Outdated Latin oinos, from Proto-Italic *oinos, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /œ̃/, /ɛ̃/
  • (Quebec) IPA(key): /œ̃˞/
  • When used as a numeral or noun, it’s handled as aspirated (no liaison with that which precedes). Examine onze.
  • When used as an article or pronoun, liaison does apply usually.
  • Rhymes: -œ̃, -ɛ̃

Article[edit]

un m (female une, plural des, destructive de)

  1. an, a

Numeral[edit]

un

  1. one

Noun[edit]

un m (plural un)

  1. one

Pronoun[edit]

un m

  1. one

Additional studying[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ūnus.

Article[edit]

un m (female une)

  1. a, an

Adjective[edit]

un

  1. one

Numeral[edit]

un (female une)

  1. one

Pronoun[edit]

un

  1. one

Associated phrases[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Outdated Galician and Outdated Portuguese un, ũu, from Latin ūnus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): (article) /uŋ/, (numeral) /ˈuŋ/

Article[edit]

un m sg (female unha, masculine plural uns, female plural unhas)

  1. (indefinite) a, one

Utilization notes[edit]

The article un and its inflected types unha, uns, and unhas all type contractions with the prepositions con (with), de (of, from), and en (in).

Derived phrases[edit]

Numeral[edit]

un m (female unha)

  1. one

Utilization notes[edit]

The numeral un and its female type unha type contractions with the prepositions con (with), de (of, from), and en (in).

Derived phrases[edit]

References[edit]

  • “un” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI – ILGA 2006-2012.
  • “ũu” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez – Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • “un” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI – ILGA 2006-2013.
  • “un” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Garifuna[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Postposition[edit]

un

  1. to

Inflection[edit]


German Low German[edit]

Different types[edit]

  • on (in Low Prussian and another dialects)

Etymology[edit]

Finally cognate to German und.

Conjunction[edit]

un

  1. and

    Planten un Blomenvegetation and flowers


Guinea-Bissau Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese um. Cognate with Kabuverdianu un.

Numeral[edit]

un

  1. one (1)

Article[edit]

un

  1. a, an (indefinite article)

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Of unknown origin.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

un

  1. (transitive) to be bored of, to be fed up with, to be uninterested in

Conjugation[edit]

Derived phrases[edit]

(With verbal prefixes):

References[edit]

Additional studying[edit]

  • un in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.

Hunsrik[edit]

Different types[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Center Excessive German unde, from Outdated Excessive German unti, from Proto-Germanic *andi, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂énti.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

un

  1. and
    Draus is es kalt un nass.

    It is chilly and moist exterior.
    Ich kaafe Epple un Bananne.

    I purchase apples and bananas.

Additional studying[edit]


Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French unItalian unSpanish un.

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /un/

Numeral[edit]

un

  1. one

Derived phrases[edit]

  •  una (one (displaying unity))
  •  unajo (unit)
  •  unesala (unitary)
  •  unesma (first)
  •  unesme (first, at first, to start with)
  •  uneso (unity, oneness)
  •  unfoye (as soon as, one time)
  •  unigar (to unify: to type into one)
  •  unigo (unification)
  •  -uno
  •  uno (unit)
  •  unu (one (particular person))

 


Interlingua[edit]

Article[edit]

un

  1. an, a

Numeral[edit]

un

  1. one

Interlingue[edit]

Article[edit]

un

  1. Indefinite article: a

Numeral[edit]

un

  1. one

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From uno, from Latin ūnus (one).

Pronunciation[edit]

Article[edit]

un m (see uno)

  1. an, a

Noun[edit]

un m (see uno)

  1. one

Adjective[edit]

un m (see uno)

  1. one

Pronoun[edit]

un m (see uno)

  1. one

Anagrams[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

un

  1. Rōmaji transcription of うん

Kabuverdianu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese um.

Numeral[edit]

un

  1. one (1)

Article[edit]

un

  1. a, an (indefinite article)

Karakalpak[edit]

Noun[edit]

un

  1. flour

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ūnus.

Adjective[edit]

un

  1. one

Noun[edit]

un m (uncountable)

  1. one

Latvian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Center Low German un (and). It changed, on this sense, the particle ir (examine Lithuanian ir, which nonetheless has the sense of “and”). At first there have been competing borrowings from different Germanic dialects (e.g. und, unde), and a few types had been influenced by ir (leading to ind, in), however from the 18th century on, the shape un step by step turned dominant.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

un

  1. additive conjunction used to hyperlink related phrases in a clause; and

    Didzis un Ilga apstājāsDidzis and Ilga stopped

    tas ir skaists un dārgsthat is stunning and costly

    tēvs strādā un domāfather is working and considering

  2. used to hyperlink clauses inside a sentence; and

    Lupatu Zeta smējās tik sirsnīgi, ka asaras sakāpa acīs un pat Lupats pieliecās klausītiesLupatu Zeta laughed so heartily that tears crammed her eyes and even Lupats leaned ahead to hear

    pie tēva vīri atnāk uz runāšanu… Annelei patīk skatīties, kādi tie vīri un kā viņi runā(some) males got here to father to speak… Annele appreciated to look what these males appeared like and how they spoke

  3. used to hyperlink two unbiased clauses, indicating simultaneity, sequence, distinction, opposition, or comparability between them; and

    uzlec saule, un sākas jauna dienathe solar rises, and a brand new day begins

    Annele papurināja smiedamās galvu, un visi lakati bija atkal nostAnnele shook her head, laughing, and all scarves had been (= fell) off as soon as extra

    Ansis bija noliesējis gluži dzeltenīgs, nomocījis, un tomēr viņa acīs bija arī līksmībaAnsis had misplaced weight, grown slightly yellow, (he appeared) run down, and but in his eyes there was additionally pleasure

    pavasarī viņam palika pieci gadi, un tas jau bija diezgan cienījams vecumsin spring he turned 5 years (previous), and that was already fairly a decent age

  4. used to introduce an unbiased clause, linking it to the previous context

    mātei varēja stāstīt visu… vai tiešām visu? un Ģirts atskārta, ka pēdējā laikā noticis daudz kas tāds, par ko viņš tomēr nestāstīs mātei…mom would possibly inform all the pieces… actually all the pieces? and Ģirts realized that not too long ago many issues had occurred that he would not inform mom…

    atceries, cik Latvijā šis vārds skanēja noslēpumaini un vilinoši: Kalifornija! un tagad ļoti labvēlīgs liktenis tevi iespēlējis tieši teiksmainajā Kalifornijābear in mind how in Latvia this phrase sounds mysterious and tempting: California! and now a really favorable destiny has introduced you to legendary California

References[edit]


Ligurian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ūnus, from Outdated Latin oinos, from Proto-Italic *oinos, finally from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

un m (female ùnn-a)

  1. one

Noun[edit]

un m (invariable)

  1. The primary.

Article[edit]

un m (female ùnn-a)

  1. a, an (male)

Utilization notes[edit]

  • When adopted by a phrase starting with a vowel, the article undergoes apheresis, changing into ‘n, and the place of articulation of the nasal adjustments from velar to dental:
    un + òmmo → ‘n òmmo (“a person”) (pronounced [ˈnɔmmu], NOT [ˈŋɔmmu])
  • When adopted by a phrase starting with a consonant:
    • the article turns into in (pron. /iŋ/), if:
      • it’s present in sentence-initial place, or after a punctuation mark
      • it’s preceded by a phrase ending in /ŋ/
        in matìn in figeu o corîva – a boy was operating one morning (pron. [iŋ maˈtiŋ iŋ fiˈd͡ʒø u kuˈriːva])
    • the article undergoes apheresis, changing into ‘n, with out the nasal altering place of articulation:
      ò visto ‘n zìn – I noticed a sea urchin (pron. [ɔ ˈvistu ŋ ˈziŋ])

Pronoun[edit]

un m (female ùnn-a)

  1. somebody, an individual
    Ò vìsto un ch’o m’à dæto dêxe éori.

    I noticed somebody who gave me ten euros.

Livonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Finally from Center Low German un, most likely by Latvian un.

Interjection[edit]

un

  1. and

Louisiana Creole French[edit]

Numeral[edit]

un

  1. one

Luxembourgish[edit]

Different types[edit]

  • u (used earlier than consonants apart from d, h, n, t, z)

Etymology[edit]

From Outdated Excessive German ana. The shape is phonetically common by the developments -a--ue- in initially open syllables, and -ue--u- earlier than nasals.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

un (+ dative or accusative)

  1. on; at; to
    D’Biller hänken un der Wand.

    The photographs grasp on the wall.

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *oinos, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos. Examine Breton unan, Cornish onan, Irish aon.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /eːn/, /ɯːn/, /uːn/

Numeral[edit]

un

  1. one

Associated phrases[edit]


Center French[edit]

Different types[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Outdated French un, from Latin ūnus (one).

Pronunciation[edit]

Article[edit]

un

  1. a, an

Numeral[edit]

un (invariable)

  1. one

Descendants[edit]


Center Welsh[edit]

Different types[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *ʉn, from Proto-Celtic *oinos, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

un

  1. one

Mutation[edit]

Center Welsh mutation
Radical Smooth Nasal H-prothesis
un unchanged unchanged hun
Word: A few of these types could also be hypothetical. Not each
potential mutated type of each phrase really happens.

Additional studying[edit]

  • Simon Evans (1964) A Grammar of Center Welsh, Dublin Institute for Superior Research, § 1

Mirandese[edit]

Article[edit]

un m (female ua)

  1. a, an

Different types[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Outdated French uns, from Latin ūnus (one).

Pronunciation[edit]

Article[edit]

un m

  1. a / an (masculine indefinite article)

Coordinate phrases[edit]

Numeral[edit]

un m (female ieune)

  1. (Jersey) one

Numeral[edit]

un

  1. one

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Outdated Occitan un, from Latin ūnus (one).

Article[edit]

un m (female una)

  1. a, an (masculine singular indefinite article)

Numeral[edit]

un

  1. one

Additional studying[edit]

  • Joan de Cantalausa (2006) Diccionari basic occitan a partir dels parlars lengadocians, 2 version, →ISBN, web page 1009.

Outdated French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ūnum, accusative singular of ūnus (one).

Pronunciation[edit]

Article[edit]

un

  1. a, an (masculine indirect singular indefinite article)
  2. a, an (masculine nominative plural indefinite article)

Declension[edit]

Numeral[edit]

cardinal quantity
1 Earlier: n/a
Subsequent: deus

un (nominative uns, female une)

  1. one

Descendants[edit]


Outdated Portuguese[edit]

Article[edit]

un

  1. Different type of ũu

Palikur[edit]

Noun[edit]

un n

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Languages of the Amazon (2012, →ISBN

Papiamentu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish uno and Portuguese um and Kabuverdianu un.

Numeral[edit]

un

  1. one (1)

Article[edit]

un

  1. a, an (indefinite article)

Pennsylvania German[edit]

Different types[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate to German und, English and.

Conjunction[edit]

un

  1. and

Piedmontese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ūnus, from Outdated Latin oinos, from Proto-Italic *oinos. Cognates embrace Italian uno and French un.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

un

  1. one

Romanian[edit]

Different types[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ūnus, from Outdated Latin oinos, from Proto-Italic *oinos, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

Pronunciation[edit]

Article[edit]

un m or n (female singular o, plural niște)

  1. a, an (indefinite article)

Utilization notes[edit]

Un can also be used as a cardinal quantity (see unu and una).

O is used for female nouns:

un visa dream (neuter)

Declension[edit]

Associated phrases[edit]

  • unu (used as a numeral/cardinal quantity)
  • unul (used as an indefinite pronoun)

Saterland Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Outdated Frisian and, from Proto-Germanic *andi. Cognates embrace West Frisian en and German und.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

un

  1. and

References[edit]

  • “un” in Saterfriesisches Wörterbuch

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Numeral[edit]

un (Cyrillic spelling ун)

  1. (Chakavian) one (1)

Synonyms[edit]


Sicilian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From unu, from Latin ūnus.

Article[edit]

un m sg

  1. (indefinite) a, an

Utilization notes[edit]

Un isn’t used earlier than phrases beginning with the letter z or s and a consonant, just like the Italian un

See additionally[edit]


Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *onъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry wants pronunciation info. In case you are acquainted with the IPA then please add some!

Determiner[edit]

un

  1. (regional) that

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From uno, from Latin ūnus (one), from Outdated Latin oinos, from Proto-Italic *oinos, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos (one).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

un m (apocopate, commonplace type uno)

  1. (earlier than the noun) Apocopic type of uno one

Utilization notes[edit]

The shape un is barely used earlier than and throughout the noun phrase of the masculine singular noun that it modifies. In different positions, uno is used as an alternative.

Article[edit]

un m (indefinite, plural unos, female una, female plural unas)

  1. a

Utilization notes[edit]

  • When a female noun begins with a confused -a or -ha, un is used as an alternative of una to stop the sound from getting used twice.
¡Mira al cielo, hay un águila!

Have a look at the sky, there’s an eagle!
¡Manos arriba, tengo un arma!

Arms up, I’ve a gun!

Numeral[edit]

un (Cyrillic spelling ун)

  1. ten

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Outdated Turkic [script needed] (un), from Proto-Turkic *ūn.

Noun[edit]

un (particular accusative unu, plural unlar)

  1. flour

Declension[edit]


Turkmen[edit]

Noun[edit]

un (particular accusative ?, plural ?)

  1. flour

Noun[edit]

un (plural unlar)

  1. flour

Venetian[edit]

Different types[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ūnus.

Article[edit]

un m (female na)

  1. masculine singular indefinite article; a / an

See additionally[edit]

Venetian articles (edit)
m sg f sg m pl f pl
Particular articles
(the)
el / al (Belluno)
l’ (earlier than vowels)
la
l’ (necessary earlier than a, non-compulsory earlier than different vowels)
i le / ‘e (Padua)
Indefinite articles
(a / an)
un / on (rural) na

Etymology[edit]

From Center Welsh un, from Proto-Brythonic *ʉn, from Proto-Celtic *oinos, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

un

  1. solely

Numeral[edit]

un

  1. one

Noun[edit]

un m (plural unau)

  1. one, particular person

Associated phrases[edit]

Mutation[edit]

References[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–current) , “un”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru On-line (in Welsh), College of Wales Centre for Superior Welsh & Celtic Research

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